Artists > Michel Macréau

Michel Macréau

Artworks

Visage, 1964, crayon et pastel sur papier, 64 x 49 cm
Visage, 1964, crayon et pastel sur papier, 64 x 49 cm
« Châteaufort », 1963, huile sur drap, 185 x 130 cm
« Châteaufort », 1963, huile sur drap, 185 x 130 cm
Sans titre, 1968, huile sur toile de jute, 115 x 80 cm
Sans titre, 1968, huile sur toile de jute, 115 x 80 cm
Sans titre, 1962, huile sur toile, 160 x 115 cm
Sans titre, 1962, huile sur toile, 160 x 115 cm
Sans titre, 1960, huile sur drap, 100 x 68 cm
Sans titre, 1960, huile sur drap, 100 x 68 cm
Couple, 1964, huile sur toile, 55 x 46 cm
Couple, 1964, huile sur toile, 55 x 46 cm
Portrait, 1964, huile sur toile, 36 x 30 cm
Portrait, 1964, huile sur toile, 36 x 30 cm
Sans titre, 1962, huile sur toile, 144 x 113 cm
Sans titre, 1962, huile sur toile, 144 x 113 cm
Visage, 1964, crayon et pastel sur papier, 64 x 49 cm
« Châteaufort », 1963, huile sur drap, 185 x 130 cm
Sans titre, 1968, huile sur toile de jute, 115 x 80 cm
Sans titre, 1962, huile sur toile, 160 x 115 cm
Sans titre, 1960, huile sur drap, 100 x 68 cm
Couple, 1964, huile sur toile, 55 x 46 cm
Portrait, 1964, huile sur toile, 36 x 30 cm
Sans titre, 1962, huile sur toile, 144 x 113 cm

Exhibitions(principal)

Personal

19620201 « Galerie Raymond Cordier », Galerie Raymond Cordier, Paris

Collective

Biographie

1935 Born on July 21st in Paris.

1953 Studied in the Arts section of the Lycée de Sèvres. Participated in the making of tapestries by Le Corbusier.

1954 –1956 Attended the Grande-Chaumière Academy.

1959 Collective studio and moved in with friends in an uninhabited castle in the valley of Chevreuse. He abandons the paint brush in favor of a tube that he pressed directly on the canvas or paper.

1960 Macréau begins to use any surface he can get his hands on to paint (bed sheets, bags, planks of wood...).

1972 Isolated and tired, Macréau has doubts about his painterly approach. He painted very little for several years.

1994 Galerie Alain Margaron begins to represent and show Macréau's work regularly.

1995 Death of the artist.

Bibliography

– « Michel Macréau », textes de Roland H. Wiegenstein, Jean-Jacques Lévêque et

Georg Nothelfer, Berlin, 1987

– « Macréau », texte de Bernard Lamarche-Vadel, (édition Galerie Caroline Beltz), 1988

– « Macréau, trente ans de peinture », textes de Bernard Lamarche-Vadel et Jacques Martineau, (éditions Barbier/La Différence), Paris, 1989

– « Michel Macréau », texte de Marisa Vescovo, (édition Peccolo Livourne), 1989

– « Macréau, peintures-objets », (édition Galerie Barbier-Beltz), Paris, 1990

– « Hommage à Michel Macréau », (édition Peccolo, Livourne), 1992

– « Michel Macréau, trente-cinq années de démêlés avec soi et avec la peinture », L’œuf sauvage, n° 8, 1993

– « Michel Macréau », textes de Jean-Dominique Jacquemond, Marie-Odile Briot, Jean-Louis Lanoux, (éditions Fus-Art), Paris, 1995

– « Michel Macréau », textes de Paul Rebeyrolle et de Jean-Pierre Courcol, (édition Espace Paul Rebeyrolle), 1999

– « La Vérité en peinture de Michel Macréau », texte de Gérard Durozoi, (édition Alain Margaron), Paris, 2000

– « Michel Macréau », collection reConnaître, (éditions RMN), 2001

– « Michel Macréau », textes de Claudie Pessey et Jacques Martineau, (édition Nicolas Deman), Paris, 2007

– « Entre diable et Dieu », texte d’Alexandre Grenier, (Alain Margaron Editeur), 2009

– « Face à faces », texte de Manuel Jover, (Alain Margaron Editeur), 2012

– « Michel Macréau par son marchand », (Alain Margaron Editeur), 2015

Public Collections

Musée d’Art moderne de la Ville de Paris

Fonds national d’Art contemporain (FNAC)

The Alain Margaron Gallery began with Michel Macréau, who died in 1995. A very difficult artist to classify according to the usual categories or contemporary art, Macréau became known in the 1960’s sometimes as a disciple of the CoBrA movement, sometimes as a marginal representative of raw art (art brut),or as a precursor of new figuration or narrative figuration.

His remarkable paintings and drawings in the 1960’s presented here are practically unknown.  They are, however, the works that show the highest level of artistic maturity, and those that best facilitate the understanding of a solitary painter who transcends all classifications in the history of art.

Michel Macréau proposes obsessive and shocking figurations, voluntarily naïve, based within the graphic vocabulary of children, marginal people, and the mentally ill.  He expresses the most intimate themes, anguish, nostalgia and traumas in the language of a street artist reminiscent of urban graffiti.  He always maintains a sensitive and delicate equilibrium between, pictorial and graphic creativity and a delirious and transgressive imagination which is sometimes shocking and obsessional.  The artist depicts in a singular and personal manner his most intimate traumas.

“I find that the comparison with Basquiat is evident.  Certain paintings are very close, but people don’t want to see it.  In the past I amused myself by describing details in his work – like certain heads – for Basquiat, at it worked”  (Combas, 2014)