Artists > Dado

Dado

Artworks

Sans titre, 1960, huile sur toile, 103 x 80 cm
Sans titre, 1960, huile sur toile, 103 x 80 cm
Sans titre, 2002, huile sur drap, 228 x 107 cm
Sans titre, 2002, huile sur drap, 228 x 107 cm
Sans titre, 2003, huile sur carton et toile, 230 x 80 cm
Sans titre, 2003, huile sur carton et toile, 230 x 80 cm
Les éléphants, 1965, huile sur toile, 97 x 260 cm
Les éléphants, 1965, huile sur toile, 97 x 260 cm
Sans titre, 1979, collages et gouache, 56 x 37 cm
Sans titre, 1979, collages et gouache, 56 x 37 cm
Le Camping de Bari, 1971, huile sur toile, 193,5 × 278 cm
Le Camping de Bari, 1971, huile sur toile, 193,5 × 278 cm
Saint-Luc, 2011, 120x80cm, Boite, technique mixte et collages
Saint-Luc, 2011, boîte, technique mixte et collages, 120 x 80cm
Sans titre, 1964, encre de Chine, 65 x 50 cm
Sans titre, 1964, encre de Chine, 65 x 50 cm
Sans titre, 1960, huile sur toile, 103 x 80 cm
Sans titre, 2002, huile sur drap, 228 x 107 cm
Sans titre, 2003, huile sur carton et toile, 230 x 80 cm
Les éléphants, 1965, huile sur toile, 97 x 260 cm
Sans titre, 1979, collages et gouache, 56 x 37 cm
Le Camping de Bari, 1971, huile sur toile, 193,5 × 278 cm
Saint-Luc, 2011, 120x80cm, Boite, technique mixte et collages
Sans titre, 1964, encre de Chine, 65 x 50 cm

Exhibitions(principal)

Personal

Collective

Biographie

1933 Birth of Miodrag Djuric, aka Dado, in Monténégro (ex Yugoslavia).

1951 Fine arts School of Belgrade.

1956 Installation in France. Met Jean Dubuffet, who introduced him to dealer Daniel Cordier.

2010 Death of the artist.

Bibliography

– 1991 Dado, texte d’Alain Bosquet, (Ed. La Différence)

– 2002 « Dado-Réquichot, La guerre des nerfs » – Textes d’Alain Mousseigne, Catherine Gaich, Alfred Pacquement, Alain Jouffroy, Pierre Bettencourt, Michel Giroud, Daniel Cordier – Entretien de Dado avec Amarante Djuric – (Ed. Musée des Abattoirs de Toulouse)

– 2002 Dado, « La Chapelle Saint-Luc » – Préface d’Alain Margaron, texte de Bernard Noël, entretien de Dado avec Amarante Djuric (éditions Alain Margaron)

Public Collections

Musée d'art moderne Paris

Fonds National d’Art Contemporain

Bibliothèque nationale, Paris

Centre national d’art contemporain, Paris

Musée national d’art moderne, Centre Pompidou, Paris

Musée d’Art moderne de la Ville de Paris

Musée d’Art Moderne, Saint-Etienne

Musée Boymans van Beuningen, Rotterdam, Pays-Bas

Musée de l’Université Brandeis, Boston, USA

Art Institue, Chicago, USA

Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New-York

Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam, Pays-Bas

Musées Royaux de Belgique, Bruxelles, Belgique

Musée d’Art Moderne de Belgrade

Musée des beaux-arts de Cetinje

Dado was born in 1933 and died in 2010. He created a fantastic universe, often close to childhood fairy tales, to denounce the atrocities of the 20th Century with a violence which sometimes is almost unbearable.
Under his real name, Miodrag Djuric, this artist, born in Montenegro, was exposed to his first artistic experiences within a baroque atmosphere in cities in Slovenia and Montenegro within the former Austro-Hungarian Empire. His work combines the excesses and outbursts of the Baroque period, and a latent morbidity, which captures the spectator in an unending fascination.
Working at first as a surrealist, he was introduced to the Parisian art scene by the gallery owner Daniel Cordier in the late 1950’s. Early in the 1960’s his nightmarish iconographic universe took its source in the souvenirs of massacres and atrocities he witnessed as a child in his native land during the Second World War. In his imagination, these souvenirs mix with the his apprehensions concerning the destructive power of nuclear weapons, and give rise to images and specters which remind us of Bosch, Bruegel or Goya. With Dado, the horror of the world finds its expression in a direct and undisguised manner. His silhouettes and his monstrous figures in stone represent a world after the catastrophe. Bathed in the most delicate colors they show a universe in decomposition where the mineral mutates imperceptibly into organic creatures, where life and death are undifferentiated. It is a universe in constant metamorphosis where certitudes are impossible.

The fantastic worlds in his paintings during the 1960’s are relentless, leaving no escape for the observer. The violence, the fear and a quasi-morbid embodiment increases in intensity until becoming almost physically painful, imprisoning, fascinating and aggressing the visitor all at once. The unfathomable depth of his imagination – reflecting both souvenirs and projections of the future – are expressed in a much diversified manner in his work, whether it be paintings, three-dimensional works, collages, or etchings. Over half a century, Dado was able to capture from his fears and obsessions images which were forever renewed. His paintings and objects scare and attract simultaneously, while his collages and torn and repainted papers emit an unexpected, almost juvenal, creative freshness.
Dado is among the major representatives of imaginative art, whose roots can be found in the distant past.

 

Reproductions of some of the 156 works in the Centre Pompidou Collections:

La Grande Ferme – Hommage à Bernard Réquichot, 1962-1963 / Sans titre, 1996 / Dessin de myxomatose1962 / Sans titre, 1996 / Triomphe de la mort1955 / Sans titre, 1981 / Sans titre, 1962 / Sans titre, 1981 / Figure couchée1956 / Sans titre, 1960 / Sans titre, 1996

Works from the collections of the Musée d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris:

La paurte de l’abattoir, 1961